The Local Farey Tale of Knoephla Soup

Knoephla Soup at Kroll’s Diner in Fargo, ND

One year ago I launched Local Farey Tales. And it’s been an incredible labor of love. I’ve loved getting to “meet” all the Tale-Tellers over Zoom or phone and then sharing their tales with people far and wide.

While I took a break to regroup for Season 2, I’m happy to announce that the new season has officially begun with the release of “The Local Farey Tale of Knoephla Soup”.

When I first spoke to the artist, Jonathan Reich, about creating the Local Farey Tales logo, he revealed he was from North Dakota. I remembered trying “lumpy yellow soup” when in Fargo but couldn’t remember the official name. Jonathan was quick to inform me about it and the soup was put on the list for a future episode. When the time finally came to start interviews, I knew I had to include Jonathan and I’m happy to say he agreed to contribute to this episode.

This episode is the shortest one yet but no less filled with lots of info & anecdotes!

You can listen to the episode here or anywhere you stream podcasts.

Note: The photo is from the first time I had Knoephla Soup. It was at Kroll’s Diner in Fargo, ND where it’s also known as “Lumpy Yellow Soup”. 🙂

Listen: The Local Farey Tale of Knoephla Soup

Episode Notes:

Welcome to Season 2! The Local Farey Tale of Knoephla Soup is told in 3 chapters (averaging 12 minutes each) ladling together the voices of the following Tale-Tellers… Kiah Gumeringer (Mary Ellen’s Bistro), Mark Heidrich (The Grill), Michael Miller (Germans from Russia Heritage Collection), Ben Myhre (Ramshackle Pantry), Carmen Rath-Wald (Tri-County Tourism Alliance), and Jonathan Reich

Credits: Music by Anisha Thomas, Artwork by Jonathan Reich, Narrator, Concept, Production and Editing by Nora Vetter

Support Local Farey Tales by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/local-farey-tales

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Find out more: Kroll’s Diner, Medina, ND

The Local Farey Tale of the Pasty

Pasty from UP North Sandwich & Pasty Co, Richland, MI

Phew! This episode marks the end of Season One!

And what an episode it is! It is the longest episode to date and I must admit, it could have been much longer! As always, my Tale-Tellers provided me with an abundance of wonderful content. Take your time with this one. Lots of potential rabbit holes of info to go down. 🙂

This episode features the Pasty. A local fare I first heard about when visiting Michigan. I had zero clue at the time of how far-reaching yet still distinctly regional this fare was at the time. But when I started research for this episode it soon became clear. While I’ve kept my previous episode interviews within the U.S., this time the tale couldn’t be told without international voices and I’m delighted that so many agreed to contribute!

You can listen to the episode here (or anywhere you stream podcasts). BUT if you stream elsewhere, be sure to check out the supplemental content via that same link.

Note: The pasty photo is from the only time I’ve had a pasty so far. However, thanks to a recommendation from David Oates, I’ll be headed to Grass Valley, CA for their Cornish Christmas and trying another one soon!

Listen: The Local Farey Tale of the Pasty

Episode Notes:

Final episode of Season 1: The Local Farey Tale of the Pasty is a global tale told in 5 chapters (averaging 25 minutes each) layering together the voices of the following Tale-Tellers… Nicholas Davey (Orange Spot Bakery), Jean Ellis (Keweenaw Kernewek), Glyn Hughes (Foods of England), Mike Kiernan (Cornish Global Migration Programme), David Oates (Camborne Twinning Committee), The Pasty Guy, Marilyn Philbey (National Trust of Moonta), Leah Polzien (Pasty Fest), Deborah Reeve (Redruth Town Councillor) and Lynn Spurling (Kernewek Lowender)

Credits: Music by Anisha Thomas, Artwork by Jonathan Reich, Narrator, Concept, Production and Editing by Nora Vetter

Support Local Farey Tales by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/local-farey-tales

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Find out more: El Museo de Paste (Pasty Museum), Redruth Mining & Pasty Festival, Festival Internacional del Paste, Henderson’s Relish, Chow Chow, Cornish Pasty Association, The Great Aussie Pasty Competition, Protected Food

The Local Farey Tale of Loco Moco

Loco Moco at Kualoa Ranch

Just in time for Labor Day Weekend listening, it’s a new episode of Local Farey Tales!

This episode (6!) features Loco Moco. Although the dish has escaped it’s original borders of Hilo, Hawaii, and can be found here and there around the globe, it is still very much a beloved local fare.

As I listened to the Tale-Tellers speak about the dish, I couldn’t help but think about doughburgers/slugburgers/Dudie Burgers as the Hawaiian-style burger was described. And wondered…has anyone created Southern fusion Loco Moco? Which then had me wondering about other local fare fusions/mash ups. As the podcast grows its audience, I would love to have live shows interviewing people about iconic food at different state fairs. Perhaps I’ll just have to add a food truck to that plan and offer some of these local fare fusions. 🙂

You can listen to the episode here (or anywhere you stream podcasts). BUT if you stream elsewhere, be sure to check out the supplemental content via that same link.

Note: The photo is from the only time I’ve had Loco Moco so far. I had wanted to try it and the cafe at this tour stop was my only opportunity. It was okay but after hearing everyone speak of all the other options in Hawaii, I can’t wait to go back and properly sample a few!

Listen: The Local Farey Tale of Loco Moco

Episode Notes:

The Local Farey Tale of Loco Moco is told in 3 chapters (averaging 18 minutes each) layering together the voices of the following Tale-Tellers… Jason Chin (Frolic Hawaii), Arnold Hiura (Hawaii Japanese Center), Gregg Hoshida (Frolic Hawaii), Dean Shigeoka (White Guava Cafe), Lanai Tabura (Aloha Plate Food Tour), George Takahashi (Lincoln Wrecker) and Audrey Wilson (Hawaii Tribune-Herald)

Credits: Music by Anisha Thomas, Artwork by Jonathan Reich, Narrator, Concept, Production and Editing by Nora Vetter

Support Local Farey Tales by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/local-farey-tales

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Find out more: Cafe 100 (Third-generation Owner/Operator, Mari Kobayashi Leung, offered the below video for further information about Cafe 100), Liliha Bakery (Connie Wong, Marketing and Social Media Lead at Yummy Restaurant Group kindly answered some questions via email about Liliha Bakery which you’ll find below the video), Aloha Plate Truck, Hawaii Plantation Museum, Hilo Tsunami 1960, Hannara Restaurant, L&L Hawaiian BBQ, Pine Tree Cafe, Tasty Crust

Q&A about Liliha Bakery

Describe what’s in a traditional Loco Moco

A traditional loco moco is normally made with white rice, topped with a hamburger, a fried egg, and brown gravy. At Liliha Bakery, we offer different variations where customers can actually order their loco moco with brown rice or fried rice and add on grilled mushrooms and onions. 

What is the origin story of Loco Moco as you know it?

The Loco Moco was actually created back in the late 1940s in Hilo where a group of hungry teenagers called the” Lincoln Wreckers”  were trying to buy some food at the Lincoln Grill (now closed).  The story goes that they didn’t have a lot of money to spend and they couldn’t afford a normal hamburger plate which cost $2-$3 at the time, so they came up with the idea to ask for a bowl of rice with a hamburger and gravy on it, and the owners gave it a try and charged them 30 cents for the dish. As for the name, they named it after one of the teenagers who was nicknamed crazy for doing crazy dares. One of them was studying Spanish and suggested using loco and they just used the word moco since it rhymed.


How old is Liliha Bakery? What is its origin story and where are the locations? Describe layout with counter and grill. (Is this only at the original location?)

Liliha Bakery just turned 71 last Friday (August 20). It originally started as a tiny retail outlet on Liliha Street by Roy and Koo Takakuwa. They began selling loaves of bread in 1950 and as their popularity grew they decided to move to Kuakini street, where you’ll still find the original location today. Since then, Liiliha Bakery has become an integral part of the community and now has 3 other locations: Nimitz Hwy, Macy’s Ala Moana, and the International Marketplace in Waikiki opening in the Holiday of 2021.  To pay homage to the original location, we have kept the counter and grill layout where guests can view what is happening in the kitchen. 


What are the other popular menu items the bakery is known for?


Our popular items from our bakery include coco puffs, poi mochi donuts, butter rolls, and our chantilly cake. When it comes to our coffee shop side, our most popular dishes are the Loco moco (of course), Country Style Omelet, and our Hot Cakes!  

If you know, was the Loco Moco always a part of the menu? If not, when was it added?

The item was added in 2008 when Liliha Bakery was acquired by Yummy Restaurant Group. 


What is it about the Liliha Bakery Loco Moco that makes it stand out from the other Loco Mocos out there? (Not expecting to have any secret ingredients given away but just in general.) Is fried rice version a unique offering compared to other places? Can people customize their eggs? What type of gravy is used?

We always use quality and fresh produce for all of our coffee shop dishes. For our Loco moco, we use great quality Angus chuck beef that is hand-pressed, always fresh, and never frozen. We also prepare them slightly differently instead of just grilling our patties. No two restaurants prepare their fried rice the same, so we would like to say ours is different from other places. Customers are able to choose how they’d like their eggs prepared and for our gravy, that’s something that we’d like to keep secret. 


In a non-pandemic time, how many Loco Mocos would be ordered/made on average during the breakfast rush? (Assuming breakfast is the most popular time they are ordered?) Is it THE most popular dish during breakfast? If not, what outranks it?

The Loco Moco is the most popular dish for breakfast and approximately we sell maybe 100  dishes a day at all of our locations (dine-in/takeout). 

The Local Farey Tale of Berger Cookies

(DeBaufre Bakeries) Berger Cookies from Baltimore, MD

Introducing episode/chapter 5…The Local Farey Tale of Berger Cookies!

The goal is to always get a new episode out the first of every month BUT sometimes the information doesn’t surface on my timeline. I had the wonderful opportunity to have a 2nd interview with Berger Cookie Tale-Teller, Dean Krimmel, as he had gone further down the research rabbit hole of the Berger family history since our first interview. And I just couldn’t pass up the chance to include this additional information…even if it meant the episode was released a little later.

When editing this episode, I thought of a scrapbook class I took years ago. The instructor spoke about over cropping. Sometimes you can be so focused on cropping to the main subject of the photo that you end up cropping out some treasures that linger in the background. So always be mindful of what is around that subject as that may add another layer/memory to the story. That has always come into play when editing the Local Farey Tales episodes but particularly with this one. I’m lucky to always have an abundance of information to sort through but it does mean constantly walking that line of not “over cropping” but yet not getting too “into the weeds”. (I intentionally aim to keep each episode to an hour or under as another way to keep that balance, too.) And now, even though it is out in the world, my brain still buzzes with editing thoughts… so that means supplemental content may be coming soon. 🙂

You can listen to the episode here or anywhere you stream podcasts.

Note: The photo is from the second time I’ve had Berger Cookies. On a recent visit to see my Brother and Sister-in-Law, I discovered that despite living in Baltimore for a handful of years, they had never tried a Berger Cookie! So as an unofficial representative of Local Fare, I felt obligated to fix that. Of course, the bonus was that I got to have one, too.

Listen: The Local Farey Tale of Berger Cookies

Episode Notes:

The Local Farey Tale of Berger Cookies is told in 4 chapters (averaging 10 minutes each) baking together the voices of the following Tale-Tellers… Joseph Abel (Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance), Charlie DeBaufre (Berger Cookies), Rodney Henry (Dangerously Delicious), Dean Krimmel (Creative Museum Services), Ross Nochumowitz (Baltimore in a Box) and Andrew Reiner (Washington Post Article)


Find out more: German Marylanders, Blue Crab Feast, Lexington Market, King Arthur Baking Berger Cookie Recipe, Baltimore Bomb, Baltimore in a Box Ice Cream, Casey Cares, Ariel S. Winter comments on Baltimore Bomb Pie, Goetze’s Caramel Cream


Credits: Music by Anisha Thomas, Artwork by Jonathan Reich, Narrator, Concept, Production and Editing by Nora Vetter

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Support Local Farey Tales by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/local-farey-tales

The Local Farey Tale of Dorothy Lynch Home Style Dressing

8 oz “beginner size” bottle of Dorothy Lynch Home Style Dressing

Episode 4 pays tribute to one of my homestate’s favorite local fare: Dorothy Lynch Home Style Dressing.

I haven’t lived in Nebraska for over a decade but assembling this episode definitely brought back memories of visiting or passing through many of the towns mentioned…and of course having Dorothy Lynch Salad Dressing readily available. Like many of the Tale-Tellers in this episode I didn’t immediately realize why so many restaurants didn’t have Dorothy Lynch when my Dad would request it (and then get a bit irritated when they suggested French Dressing as an alternative). I just figured these restaurants were either out of the dressing because it was so popular or oddly chose not to carry it. As I grew older, I realized how unique Dorothy Lynch was to the state and how amazing it was when restaurants and stores actually did carry it in and outside of the state. It’s kept going all these years based on it’s taste/reputation and whether you’re a Nebraskan or not, there will definitely be some unique tales to uncover about the person, Dorothy Lynch and her namesake dressing in this episode. You can listen to it here.

And keep an eye on the “Dorothy Lynch Home Style Dressing Tale-Teller” posts! Mena Sprague kindly shared some family photos that include a youngster Dorothy and I’m excited to share them with you.

Note: The photo is of a bottle of Dorothy Lynch that I won during a drawing at Nebraska Coast Connection. While I was tempted to keep it for myself, I decided to send it (and a branded magnet clip) to my now retired-to-South Carolina Dad. As seen in the photo below…I think he was pleased. 🙂

Photo provided by Rosalie Vetter

Listen: The Local Farey Tale of Dorothy Lynch Home Style Dressing

Episode Notes:

The Local Farey Tale of Dorothy Lynch Home Style Dressing is told in 4 chapters (averaging 10 minutes each) bottling the voices together of the following Tale-Tellers… Marilea Hull (Tasty-Toppings), Dave Korger (Tasty-Toppings), Monty Lynch (Grandson of Dorothy Lynch and Son of Neal Lynch), Cheri Schrader (Platte County Museum), Mena Sprague (Mother was first cousins with Dorothy Lynch) and Tiffany Stoiber (GROW Nebraska)

Find out more: Dorothy Lynch recipe ideas, Nebraska Sunrise cocktail recipe, Favorite Recipes of Dorothy Lynch and Her Daughter Sally Cookbook, Howard County Historical Society (St. Paul), Gordon “Mac” Hull, Dusters Restaurant, Buy Nebraska, Bruce Bartlett, Cornhusker Ordnance Plant,

Credits: Music by Anisha Thomas, Artwork by Jonathan Reich, Narrator, Concept, Production and Editing by Nora Vetter

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Support Local Farey Tales by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/local-farey-tales

At the St. Paul, Nebraska Legion Club people got their first taste of Dorothy Lynch’s Home Style Dressing.
1955 article about the early days of selling the dressing.